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Every year, US-based non-dilutive sources of funding award billions of dollars towards pre-clinical stage research in the Life Sciences.

Funding is available for pre-clinical research across scientific fields including Infectious Diseases, Oncology, Neurosciences, and many more. These funds come from Institutes within the NIH, such as NIAID, NCI, NINDS, the NSF, the DoD, and private foundations. The NIH alone annually funds over $15B to pre-clinical stage R&D in the life sciences.

In this webinar we discuss the process for applying, guidelines, key success components, and insight into increasing chances for award.

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Congress: NIH Budget Will Not Be Cut

Congress Inks Spending Deal That Jettisons Trump Priorities

– Bloomberg News, May 1, 2017

U.S. House and Senate negotiators reached a tentative bipartisan deal on a $1.1 trillion spending bill that largely tracks with Democratic priorities and rejects most of President Donald Trump’s wish list.

Overall, the compromise resembles more of an Obama administration-era budget than a Trump one. The National Institutes of Health, for example, would see a $2 billion boost, reflecting the popularity of medical research among lawmakers.

 

Read the whole article on Bloomberg

NIH alone awards roughly $6B annually to Cancer related R&D grants and contracts. The scope of funding support covers much of the R&D cycle with an emphasis on pre-clinical work, and may cover clinical stage activities as well.

In this webinar, we discuss key cancer related opportunities, mainly within the National Cancer Institute (NCI), that are available for life science organizations.

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The National Institute of Allergies and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) awards close to $6,000,000,000 annually. Taking into account activities by DTRA, DARPA, US Army, BARDA, etc., this is a funding force no one in the field can afford to ignore.

In this webinar, we introduce you to Biodefense and Infectious Diseases sources of funding such as NIAID, DTRA, DARPA, US Army, and BARDA, and give examples of current open solicitations. We discuss the process for applying, major challenges, and how to maximize your chances for award.

 

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Opening FreeMind’s 2017 webinar series is an introduction to the SBIR and STTR mechanisms which account for over $780,000,000 awarded per year by NIH alone. These are excellent sources of funding aimed at promoting R&D activities of US-based small businesses as well as collaborations with Academics.

SBIR/STTRs differ from traditional NIH mechanisms in that they are highly product driven and ultimately are seeking commercialization of novel therapies, diagnostics, devices, etc.

In this webinar we discussed process for applying, guidelines, key success components and insight into increasing chances for award.

 

View slide deck

SBIR/STTR awards account for over $780,000,000 awarded per year by NIH alone. These are excellent sources of funding aimed at promoting R&D activities of US-based small businesses as well as collaborations with Academics.

SBIR/STTRs differ from traditional NIH mechanisms in that they are highly product driven and ultimately are seeking commercialization of novel therapies, diagnostics, devices, etc.

In this webinar we discuss process for applying, guidelines, key success components and insight into increasing chances for award.

View the SBIR/STTR webinar slide deck

To discuss the relevance of the SBIR/STTR programs to your R&D and to learn about non-dilutive funding that may be available to your organization, send us a note and we’ll get in touch with you directly!

A tough and ever-changing question.

Perhaps a quick personal historical overview might help shed light on the statement above. When I started out in this field in many years ago, there was a “three strike” policy. That basically meant that you could submit an original proposal, and then two revisions. If you didn’t get the award you had to change direction. In some cases, this caused some of our clients to regard the original as a type of “feeler” to send out before getting down to things in the following proposals. Others, correctly, took every proposal seriously. But however you looked at it, you were out after three tries.

After a few years, the NIH, presumably trying to reduce reviewer workload, if I recall correctly, changed this to a two-strike policy. That means that you had the original and a single try at a resubmission before you were “out of there” with the research idea. This caused general unhappiness in the field, because having just one chance to resubmit was kind of harsh. Researchers really didn’t like having to change projects, after getting an almost-funded 17 percentile for example. I also personally believe this didn’t make much sense when the paylines are so competitive. I mean, the difference between awarded and not-awarded is sometimes negligible in terms of score, and in the very-subjective range of reviewers’ decisions.

The surprising next move was that the NIH did an almost complete 180 degree turn in terms of concept. After a few years of having the rough two-strike policy, they went with the complete opposite, and this is what we currently have now. Yes, you can now still only resubmit (revise) your proposal once for each original, but can then go ahead and continue the cycle as many times as you like: Original – resubmission – original – resubmission and on and on. No formal limits. We may note here that the second “original” is also referred to as a “virtual A2” by the NIH itself (A2 refers to a second resubmission).

Joel Knopf
Manager of Consulting Services

 

In our next resubmission posts we will discuss:

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) supports research on many of the most common, costly, and chronic conditions to improve health.

With a FY2016 budget of over $1.8 Billion, the NIDDK supports R&D from basic research and early discovery stage projects all the way through late stage clinical trials. The NIDDK funds research in a wide variety of topics including Diabetes, Weight Management, Digestive, Kidney, Liver, Urologic and Endocrine Diseases, Nutrition, and many more.

In this webinar we cover:
• The various programs and mechanisms
• The application process
• Guidelines and regulations
• Key success components
• Insight into increasing chances for award

View the NIDDK webinar slide deck

To discuss the relevance of the NIDDK to your R&D and to learn about non-dilutive funding that may be available to your organization, send us a note and we’ll get in touch with you directly!